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Find all events here, and search by theme, location and keywords.

Look for the color-coded diamonds next to each event to see what themes they relate to: Social JusticeAn Enlightened CitizenryTolerance and UnderstandingGlobal Engagement, Food and the Environment, and Storytelling.

August | September | October | November | December | January | February | March | April | May

August 2016

August 25 – 5:30 p.m. – Love House & Hutchins Forum

Music on the Porch: Harmonyx, undergraduate a capella group performing R&B, hip hop, pop, gospel and soul. ♦︎♦︎

August 27 – 8:00 a.m. – Caldwell Hall

An intensive one day workshop on papers in progress by Amy Berg, Brookes Brown, Yoaav Isaacs, Jeff Sebo, and Steve Swartzer♦︎

August 28 – 3:30 p.m. – Person Recital Hall

The music department presents a faculty recital featuring guitar instructor Billy Stewart. ♦︎

 

September 2016

September 1—October 27 – Hanes Art Center

“No Credit, No Problem” exhibit of Josué Pellot’s work in the John and June Allcott Gallery. ♦︎♦︎

September 1 – 5:30 p.m. – Love House & Hutchins Forum

Music on the Porch: (J) Rowdy and the Night Shift, local group that combines spoken-word poetry with live jazz and other musical genres. ♦︎♦︎

September 1 – 5:30 p.m. – Ackland Art Museum

A conversation with photographer Burk Uzzle, as part of the Ackland Art Museum’s exhibition of his work. ♦︎

September 1 – 7:00 p.m. – Gerrard Hall

Philosophy in 15 Minutes: An evening of food and drink, with presentations by Alan Nelson, Lindsay Brainard and Geoffrey Sayre-McCord. ♦︎

September 5–December 9 — FedEx Global Education Center

‘Migration Narratives’ exhibition, featuring four projects: Divided by the Sea, New Roots, Home in a New Place and Carolina Connections. ♦︎♦︎

September 8-9 – Gerrard Hall, Memorial Hall

Mystical Music with Hossein Behroozinia, Behnam Samani and Saba Alizadeh. A public conversation and performance, part of Sacred/Secular: A Sufi Journey. ♦︎♦︎

September 8 – 4:00 p.m. – Hyde Hall

The “Food for All” lecture series presents Andrew Warnes to speak about the emergence of the supermarket in the mid-century U.S. and its global spread. ♦︎♦︎

September 8 – 5:30 p.m. – Love House & Hutchins Forum

Music on the Porch: Nathan Bowles and the Paradise of Bachelors. ♦︎♦︎

September 9 – 5:30 p.m. – Love House & Hutchins Forum

Process Series Opening Reception: The Institute for the Arts and Humanities and the Center for the Study of the American South kick off the 2016-17 of the UNC Process Series. ♦︎♦︎♦︎♦︎♦︎♦︎

September 9 – 5:30 p.m. – Love House & Hutchins Forum

A dramatic reading of Howard Craft’s play Orange Light♦︎♦︎♦︎♦︎

September 10 – 7:00 p.m. – Person Recital Hall

The music department presents a guest artist recital with Paul Sanchez on piano. ♦︎♦︎

September 10 – 10:15 a.m. – North Carolina Museum of Art

Portraits and Politics in the Age of Elizabeth I, an Adventures in Ideas Seminar by the Program in the Humanities in collaboration with the Program in Medieval and Early Modern Studies and the North Carolina Museum of Art. ♦︎

September 13 – 4:30 p.m. – Sonja Haynes Stone Center

Hutchins Lecture: Tracie McMillan. “Southern Hunger and the American Food System,” will be presented by award-winning journalist Tracie McMillan. ♦︎♦︎ 

September 14 – Oct 2 – Paul Green Theatre

Regional premiere of Detriot ’67 by Dominique Morisseau. PlayMakers Repertory Company. ♦︎♦︎

September 14 – 12:00 p.m. – Hyde Hall

Ethics Around the Table with Terrance Holt. ♦︎♦︎

September 15 – 5:00 p.m. – Hamilton Hall

Peter H. Wilson I will discuss “The Peace of Westphalia: Origins, Character and Significance” as part of the North Carolina German Studies seminar and workshop series. ♦︎♦︎

September 15 – 5:30 p.m. – Kenan Theatre

An Evening with Kwame Anthony Appiah: “Ethics Among the Humanities.” Kick-off to Carolina’s Human Heart. ♦︎♦︎♦︎♦︎♦︎♦︎

September 16-17 – UNC Center for School Leadership Development

Jesus Before the Gospels: Distorted Memory and the Historical Jesus, an encore seminar featuring Bart Ehrman. ♦︎♦︎

September 16 — 5:30 p.m. — Love House and Hutchins Forum

The Center for the Study of the American South opens its new exhibit with photographs from Bill Ferris’ new book, The South in Color. ♦︎♦︎

September 18 — 5:00 p.m. — Hamilton Hall

Andrea A. Sinn will discuss “Joining the German Home Front: Women, Religion, and World War I” as part of the Carolina Gender, War and Culture Series. ♦︎♦︎♦︎

September 18 – 7:30 p.m. – Memorial Hall

Ping Chong + Company presents Beyond Sacred: Voices of Muslim Identity, which delves into the diverse stories of young Muslims who came of age in a post-9/11 New York City. Part of Sacred/Secular: A Sufi Journey.

September 19 — 7:00 p.m. — Friday Center

Susan Ackerman discusses “Women in the Hebrew Bible and Ancient Israel.” ♦︎♦︎

September 20 – 5:30 p.m. – Memorial Hall

A Conversation with NPR’s Nina Totenberg: The Supreme Court and the Presidency, the 2016-17 Frey Lecture. ♦︎

September 20 – 6:00pm – Hanes Art Center

Craig Smith, whose work focuses on the process, aesthetics, and ethics of human-to-human interactivity in contemporary art, will give the Hanes Visiting Artist Lecture. 

September 21 – 6:00 p.m. – Top of the Hill Back Bar

Humanities Happy Hour. Tyler Curtain will discuss Science Fiction: Past, Present and Future. 

September 22 — October 28 — Sonja Haynes Stone Center

James Barnor: Ever Young, a touring exhibition of Barnor’s street and studio photographs at the Stone Center’s Robert and Sallie Brown Gallery and Museum. ♦︎

September 22 – 5:30 p.m. – Love House and Hutchins Forum

Music on the Porch: Ray Cashman will perform.

September 22 – 6:00 p.m. – Great Hall, Carolina Union

Helping Every Child Succeed: A Conversation with Kati Haycock, president of Education Trust, and Margaret Spellings, UNC-System president. 

September 23 — 3:00 p.m. — Love House and Hutchins Forum

2016 grant and fellowship recipients present their summer and research with the Southern Research Circle. ♦︎♦︎♦︎♦︎♦︎♦︎

September 23 – 8:00 p.m. – Kenan Music Building

Premiere of Occasional Shivers: A reimagining of the language of the Great American Songbook, as jazz meets pop against a backdrop of 1960s Manhattan. 

September 27 — All Day

First Amendment Day 2016, organized by the UNC Center for Media Law and Policy in the School of Media and Journalism, is designed to both celebrate the First Amendment and explore its role in the lives of Carolina students. 

September 27 — 6:00 p.m. — Hyde Hall

The Parr Center for Ethics hosts a discussion of the multiple causes and effects of anti-Muslim fear and hostility in the United States. 

September 27 – 6:15 p.m. – Hanes Art Center

As part of the Art History Colloquium, Tamara Sears discusses “Landscape Encounters: Envisioning Mobility and Travel in Precolonial India, c. 1340-1528.” ♦︎♦︎

September 28-29 — Multiple Venues

The first-annual Carolina Food Summit will gather chefs, writers, non-profit leaders, restaurateurs and scholars to share perspectives on and tackle challenges within North Carolina’s growing food scene. ♦︎

September 28 – 4:30 p.m. – Flyleaf Books

The Program in the Humanities hosts Presidential Power and the 2016 Elections, a Humanities in Action event. Law professor Bill Marshall considers the ramifications of growing presidential power.

September 29 – 5:00 p.m. – Gerrard Hall

2016 Lambeth Lecture. Reforming Our Criminal Justice System: A conversation between Hon. Alex Kozinski and Hon. Thomas W. Ross.

September 29 – 5:30 p.m. – Love House and Hutchins Forum

The Old Ceremony will perform at the Center for the Study of the American South’s Music on the Porch series. 

September 29 – 7:30 p.m. – Historic PlayMakers Theatre

Carolina Performing Arts and PlayMakers Repertory Company collaborate for the first of two play readings: The Hour of Feeling, by Mona Mansour. ♦︎♦︎♦︎

September 30 – October 1 – Kenan Rehearsal Hall

Process Series: Undressing Beethoven: Beyond the Cano. Reimagining of Beethoven’s Violin SonatasDevised by Nicholas DiEugenio & Mimi Solomon.

September 30 – 2:30 p.m. – Hanes Art Center

As part of the Art History Colloquium, Maggie Cao discusses her work, which focuses on the intersections of art with histories of technology, natural science, and economics.

September 30 — 3:00 p.m. — Begins at UNC Visitor’s Center

Taylor Livingston leads a Priceless Gems Tour, “Digging in Our Heels, Angels on Campus: The Herstory of Women on Campus.” ♦︎♦︎

September 30 — 5:30 p.m. — Great Hall, Carolina Union

Rita Moreno is keynote speaker for Hispanic Heritage Month, presented by the Carolina Union Activities Board in collaboration with The Carolina Latina/o Collaborative, Scholars’ Latino Initiative, Teatro Latino, and the Latina/o Studies Program. ♦︎ 

October 2016

October 1 — 9:00 a.m. — FedEx Global Education Center

Great Cities in the Middle East: Tehran and Istanbul, a Dialogues Seminar from the Program in the Humanities. 

October 4-15 – Sonja Haynes Stone Center

The Diaspora Festival of Black and Independent Films is the Stone Center’s annual series spotlighting film from all corners of the African diaspora. ♦︎

October 3-28 — Hanes Art Center

Exhibition of painter, installation artist and draftswoman Ivelisse Jiménez’s work in the John and Julie Allcott Gallery.  ♦︎

October 3 — 5:15 p.m. — Thomas Wolfe Memorial

Thomas Wolfe Scholars and UNC English and Creative Writing professors give a centennial reading honoring alumnus Thomas Wolfe. ♦︎

October 4 – 7:30 p.m. – Genome Sciences Building

Jill McCorkle will deliver the 2016 Thomas Wolfe Lecture. ♦︎

October 5 – 4:30 p.m. – Flyleaf Books

The Program in the Humanities hosts the 2016 Congressional Elections, a Humanities in Action event. Sarah Treul Roberts reviews the key issues and battleground states in the 2016 Congressional Elections.

October 5 – 5:00 p.m. – Wilson Library

Author Elissa Altman will discuss her new memoir, Treyf: My Life as an Unorthodox Outlaw, sponsored by the Carolina Center for Jewish Studies, department of American studies and UNC Food for All. 

October 5 — 7:00 p.m. — Auditorium, Carolina Union

Neil Hilborn raises mental health awareness through slam poetry. 

October 6 — 12:30 p.m. — Graham Memorial, Room 039

‘The Brexit Shock: Why it happened, and what now?’ A panel discussion featuring political science professors Liesbet Hooghe and Gary Marks. 

October 6 – 5:30pm – Love House & Hutchins Forum

Music on the Porch: Juanito Laguna, Latino group that works to promote universal human rights, featuring protest and movement songs from Chile, Bolivia, Ecuador, and Mexico.

October 6 – 5:30 p.m. – Hamilton Hall

Jeffrey Wade Jones will discuss “The Representation of Women in Svetlana Alexievich’s Zinky Boys” as part of the Carolina Gender, War and Culture series. 

October 6 – 6:30 p.m. – Hyde Hall

The Institute for the Arts and Humanities hosts a discussion on the 2016 election and humanistic issues in the current political climate with U.S. Congressman David E. Price.

October 7 — 3:00 p.m. — Begins at UNC Visitor’s Center

The UNC Visitor’s Center gives a Priceless Gems tour highlighting places on UNC’s campus with connections to famous writers and literary connections. 

October 8 – All Day – Location TBD

The Philosophy Politics & Economics program’s Undergraduate Seminar: Toleration in a Free Society.

October 10 – 6:00 p.m. – Ponysaurus Tap Room, Durham

Join the Institute for the Arts and Humanities and Andrew Reynolds to look at how micro-breweries involve communities for civic engagement.

October 11 – 12:30 p.m. – Hyde Hall

Ethics Around the Table with Maggie Cao, a scholar of American art and material culture.

October 11 — 7:30 p.m. — Great Hall, Carolina Union

Michael Sam, who made history in 2014 when he became the first openly gay player ever drafted by an NFL team, delivers the National Coming Out Day Lecture.  ♦︎

October 12 – 4:30 pm. – Flyleaf Books

The Program in the Humanities hosts Polarization, Authoritarianism and the 2016 Elections, a Humanities in Action event, with Jonathan Weiler. 

October 13-17 – Kenan Theatre

The Kenan Theatre Company presents a Lillian Chason production, Distracted, a play by Lisa Loomer examining a family dealing with a child with ADHD. 

October 13 – 12:30 p.m. – Love House & Hutchins Forum

Tell About the South lecture series. Liz Lundeen will discuss “‘One A. Philip Randolph is Worth A Thousand James E. Shepards’: Understanding Moderate Black Politics in the Wartime South.” ♦︎♦︎♦︎

October 13 — 3:00 p.m. — Begins at UNC Visitor’s Center

Rescheduled from Oct. 7: The UNC Visitor’s Center gives a Priceless Gems tour highlighting places on UNC’s campus with connections to famous writers and literary connections. 

October 13 — 6:00 p.m. — University Room, Hyde Hall

The Parr Center for Ethics hosts the Voting Rights Forum for a public discussion about voter disenfranchisement in the United States. 

October 13 – 7:30 p.m. – Memorial Hall

Alumnus soloist Michael Rowlett ’94 joins the UNC Symphony Orchestra in the music department’s Scholarship Series.

October 14-15 – National Humanities Center

Novel Sounds: American Fiction in the Age of Rock and Roll is a conference that will be convened by English associate professor Florence Dore.

October 14-15 – Kenan Music Building

Dominick Farinacci, trumpet, will perform as part of two concert series and give a masterclass on October 14 and 15. 

October 14-15 – Studio Six, Swain Hall

Process Series: Your Desires in Fragments – A translation by Adam Versenyi of Ramon Griffero’s Play.

October 14-16 – Multiple Venues

“Islam and Religious Identity: The Limits of Definition” is the annual Duke-UNC Consortium for Middle East Studies Conference.

October 14 — 3:00 p.m. — Begins at UNC Visitor’s Center

Robert Porter leads a walking tour on the African-American history of the University. ♦︎♦︎♦︎♦︎

October 14 — 8:00 p.m. — Memorial Hall

A solo acoustic performance by Richard Thompson, as part of Novel Sounds: American Fiction in the Age of Rock and Roll

October 15 — 9:15 a.m. — Knapp Sanders Building, UNC School of Government

World War II’s Important but Forgotten Battles, An Adventures in Ideas seminar from the Program in the Humanities. 

October 16 – 3:00 p.m. – Kenan Music Building

WSN Series: Alberto Ginastera Centennial Celebration with a guest lecture with Deborah Schwartz-Kates and a concert. 

October 17-31 — Art Gallery, Carolina Union

Love Makes a Family is a photojournalism exhibit featuring photographs and interviews with families that have lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) members. 

October 17 – 7:30 p.m. – Memorial Hall

UNC Wind Ensemble and UNC Symphony Band play together as part of the music department’s Scholarship Series. 

October 18 — 6:00 p.m. — Nelson Mandela Auditorium, FedEx Global Education Center

Reşat Kasaba will discuss an overview of the 2016 coup attempt in Turkey and put it in the context of modern Turkish history and politics. 

October 18 — 7:00 p.m. — FedEx Global Education Center

An evening about Israeli local produce, cultivation in the desert, and innovative irrigation systems, part of “The Israeli Cultural Salad: Israeli Popular Food & Immigration” series. 

October 19 – November 6 – Paul Green Theatre

PlayMakers Repertory Company crowns its 40th Anniversary with a fresh look at The Crucible.

October 19 — 6:00 p.m. — Top of the Hill Back Bar

Humanities Happy Hour. Visiting professor of political science Christiane Lemke discusses Great Britain’s exit from the European Union. ♦︎

October 21-23 – Multiple Venues

The 50th Chapel Hill Colloquium in Philosophy.

October 22 – 11:15 a.m. – UNC Center for School Leadership Development

History, Social Commentary, and Arthur Miller’s The Crucible, in collaboration with the PlayMakers Repertory Company’s production.

October 24 – 6:00 p.m. — FedEx Global Education Center

Fiona McLaughlin will give a talk, “Visual Language in the Landscapes of Urban Senegal.” 

October 25-26 – Person Recital Hall

Alice Giles, harp, visits to give a Guest Artist Recital and Masterclass with the music department. 

October 25 — 6:00 p.m. — Hanes Art Center

Rob Swainston delivers a Hanes Visiting Artist Lecture. 

October 25 – 7:30 p.m. – Memorial Hall

Youssou N’Dour will perform on Oct. 25 at 7:30 p.m., as part of Sacred/Secular: A Sufi Journey. There will also be two additional tie-in events immediately before the performance and on Oct. 17.

October 26 — 4:00 p.m. — Kenan Music Building

The music department hosts the U.S. Army Brass Quintet as part of a Guest Artists Concert and Clinic. 

October 26 – 4:30 p.m. – Flyleaf Books

The Program in the Humanities hosts The 2016 Elections: Trends, Polls and Presidents. Tom Carsey explains the stories behind the numbers spelling victory or defeat for this year’s candidates. 

October 26 — 6:30 p.m. — Varsity Theater

A film screening of “In Search of Israeli Cuisine,” part of “The Israeli Cultural Salad: Israeli Popular Food & Immigration” series. 

October 26 — About 10:30 p.m. — Paul Green Theatre

A special post-show discussion after The Crucible with Mark Perry and Russ Shafer-Landau. 

October 27-28 – Hyde Hall

The Art of Emergency: Aesthetics and Aid in African Crises conference. 

October 27 – 4:30 p.m. – Wilson Library

Bernard E. Powers will deliver the Hutchins Lecture, to discuss “Manners, Memory and Murder in America’s Holy City.” 

October 27 — 7:00 p.m. — Art Gallery, Carolina Union

Storytellers compete to tell a brief personal story around a ‘Scared!’ theme. 

October 28 — 12:00 p.m. — Hitchcock Room, Sonja Haynes Stone Center

Novelist Monique Truong will discuss food, literature and immigration. 

October 28 — 12:20 p.m. — FedEx Global Education Center

A roundtable discussion about “Corruption and the Erosion of Democracy in Southeastern Europe,” part of the Center for European Studies’ Friday Lecture Series. 

October 28 – 7:30 p.m. – Kenan Music Building

Celebrating Congo featuring Kinobe, Jaja Bashengezi, and Mack el Sambo General.

October 28 – 8:00 p.m. – Memorial Hall

The House is Black by Sussan Deyhim, part of the Sufi Journey. Legendary Iranian poet Forough Farrokhzad inspires this multimedia spectacle highlighting Iranian contemporary arts.  

October 29 – 9:15 a.m. – UNC Center for School Leadership Development

Innovation in the Renaissance and Early Modern Europe, an Adventures in Ideas seminar from the Program in the Humanities. 

October 29 – 7:30 p.m. – 21c Museum Hotel

Launch of Southern Cultures’ fall issue, 21c Fiction.

October 30 – 2:00 p.m. – Person Recital Hall

The music department presents Leah Peroutka, violin, for a Faculty Recital. 

October 30 – 2:00 p.m. – Carolina Inn
“October Has Come Again—Again.” A panel of established and emerging writers will offer thoughts and observations about the state of “Southern literature.”

October 30 – 5:00 p.m. – Hamilton Hall

Guy Miron will discuss Modern German-Jewish Historiography as part of the North Carolina German Studies Seminar and Workshop series. 

October 30 — 6:00 p.m. — FedEx Global Education Center

A film screening of Love, Theft & Other Entanglements with director Rami Alayan. ♦︎♦︎

November 2016

November 1-10 — Hanes Art Center

An exhibit of John Allcott’s illustrations, with a reception on Nov. 1 and Nov. 4. 

November 1 – 12:30 p.m. – Love House & Hutchins Forum

John Shelton Reed will discuss “Barbecue, Politics, and Vice Versa” for Center for the Study of the American South’s Tell About the South series.

November 1 — 3:00 p.m. — Wilson Library

Nancy Shoemaker delivers the Eighth Annual Michael D. Green Lecture in American Indian Studies for American Indian Heritage Month. ♦︎♦︎

November 1 — 5:30 p.m. — Sonja Haynes Stone Center

Jean-Yves Camus will share the facts and figures of antisemitism in 2016, and will also explore the perpetrators of antisemitic violence and the continuity of prejudices.

November 1 – 7:30 p.m. – Kenan Music Building

Global Rhythms Ensemble and Charanga Carolina perform. 

November 2 – 4:30 p.m. – Flyleaf Books

The Program in the Humanities hosts a Humanities in Action event, The 2016 North Carolina State Elections, with Ferrel Guillory. ♦︎

November 2 — 6:00 p.m. — FedEx Global Education Center

Melike Eğilmezler Boylan will discuss the role of humor in Turkish society. ♦︎♦︎♦︎♦︎

November 3-7 – Kenan Theatre

The Kenan Theatre Company presents Elephant’s Graveyard by George Brant, which is the true story of Mary, an elephant who was hung as a murderer. ♦︎♦︎♦︎♦︎♦︎

November 3 — 4:30 p.m. — Love House and Hutchins Forum

A complement to the personal stories chronicled in the Black Pioneers Project, a panel discussion about the building a radical black student movement on college and high school campuses in North Carolina in the 1960s and 1970s. ♦︎♦︎♦︎♦︎

November 3 – 5:30 p.m. – Hyde Hall

The Cultural Significance of the Ghetto of Venice for Jewish History: A Reflection on the 500th Anniversary of Its Founding. 

November 3 — 5:30 p.m. — FedEx Global Education Center

A reception and panel discussion for UNC Global’s ‘Migration Narratives’ exhibit will be held on Nov. 3. ♦︎♦︎♦︎

November 3 — 5:30 p.m. — Carolina Union

The Carolina Women’s Center hosts a panel discussion about women and gender issues in politics. ♦︎♦︎

November 4 and 6 – Sonja Haynes Stone Center

The Process Series presents The Black Pioneers Project, performances adapted from interviews by Southern Oral History Project interns of the earliest cohorts of African American students who attended UNC between 1952-1972.

November 4 — 12:20 p.m. — FedEx Global Education Center

Betina Hollstein will speak on social capital over the course of one’s life, and social selection in the transition to secondary school in Germany. ♦︎♦︎

November 4 — 3:00 p.m. — Begins at UNC Visitor’s Center 

Robert Porter leads a walking tour on the African-American history of the University. ♦︎♦︎♦︎♦︎

November 4 — 7:00 p.m. — Hanes Art Center

A guqin and guzheng concert, sponsored by the Carolina Asia Center and department of Asian studies. 

November 5 – 4:00 p.m. – Kenan Music Building

Guest Artists Masterclass with Latin/Jazz quintet Catharsis. 

November 5 – 8:00 p.m. – Kenan Music Building

A concert with Charanga Carolina, UNC Jazz Combos, and guest artist group Catharsis 

November 6 – 7:30 p.m. – Kenan Music Building

A music faculty recital with works by Bach, Beethoven and Crumb, part of the William S. Newman Artists Series and the new Moeser Favorites Series. . 

November 7-December 2 — Hanes Art Center

“Familiar Strangers” exhibit of Arjan Zazueta’s work. There will also be a workshop and opening reception on Nov. 7. 

November 7 — 6:00 p.m. — Hyde Hall

“Indigenous Foodways: A Path Toward Healing,” a Food for All discussion as part of American Indian Heritage Month. 

November 7 — 7:00 p.m. — Friday Center

A film screening and discussion of Aviva Kempner’s Rosenwald, a film about Jewish philanthropist Julius Rosenwald, who joined forces with African-American communities during the Jim Crow South. ♦︎♦︎

November 8 – Hill Hall

Two events: Guest Artists Lecture and Recital with Steve Drury, piano, and Stuart Gerber, percussion. 

November 8 — 3:30 p.m. — FedEx Global Education Center

Bartosz Rydliński will analyze how the post-1989 transitions, European integration, and current EU conflicts are shaping the ongoing illiberal developments in Visegrad 4 countries and also in the “old” member states of the EU. ♦︎♦︎

November 9 – 12:00 p.m. – Hyde Hall

Ethics Around the Table with Ariana Vigil: “What responsibility does the U.S. have toward Central American migrants?” ♦

November 10 — 6:00 p.m. — Sonja Haynes Stone Center

The Color of Courage, a two-man theatrical performance about the bravery African-American soldiers displayed while serving in the Union Army during the American Civil War. 

November 10 — 6:30 p.m. — FedEx Global Education Center

“Rebeka Does the Tango: The Jewishness of Interwar Polish Popular Culture” will examine how acculturated Jewish composers and lyricists created the new phenomena of sophisticated popular music and literary cabaret in interwar Poland. 

November 11-12 – Wilson Library

The UNC Bluegrass Symposia, which includes an exhibit opening in Wilson Library, a concert and a symposia featuring a panel discussion, academic papers and a keynote.

November 11 — 12:20 p.m. — FedEx Global Education Center

“Inequality, Growth and Intellectual Property Rights: The Differences Between America and Europe,” a Center for European Studies’ Friday Lecture Series. ♦︎♦︎

November 11 – 5:30 p.m. – Hamilton Hall

Luise White discusses the tracking of African guerrillas by the Rhodesian security forces during Zimbabwe’s liberation war. ♦︎

November 11—8 p.m. – Memorial Hall

The Steep Canyon Rangers joins the new UNC Bluegrass Band for a concert. 

November 12 – 3:00 p.m. – Kenan Rehearsal Hall

Chamber Music of Haydn featuring the Baryton: Octets, Quintets, Trios, and Duos for the Esterhazy Court, co-sponsored by Mallarmé Chamber Players. 

November 12 — 3:30 p.m. — Morehead Planetarium

Explore astronomy as a family and become familiar with the current night sky through stories that various Native American cultures have told about the Moon, planets, and stars.

November 12 — 7:30 p.m. — Carolina Union

CUAB and the UNC Muslim Students Association bring comedian and Daily Show correspondent Hasan Minhaj for a night of laughs. 

November 13 – 3:00 p.m. – Person Recital Hall

The Carolina Wind Quintet performs.

November 14 — 3:30 p.m. — FedEx Global Education Center

Erinn Whitaker will give an overview of her new methodology for assessing negotiating style at a distance, and how she uses it to assess relations between Russian President Vladimir Putin and German Chancellor Angela Merkel. ♦︎

November 14 – 7:00 p.m. – Sonja Haynes Stone Center

Ange-marie Hancock delivers the 24th Annual Sonja Haynes Stone Memorial Lecture, “Scaling Up Stories for Justice – a Role in Black Lives Matter for Every Sector of Our Community.” ♦︎♦︎

November 15 — 7:00 p.m. — FedEx Global Education Center

Israeli community members and students will share their experiences with Israeli and multicultural food and give presentations. Part of The Israeli Cultural Salad: Israeli Popular Food & Immigration” series. 

November 15 – 7:30 p.m. – Person Recital Hall

The music department presents new music from the Composition Studio, taught by Allen Anderson.

November 16 – 6:00 p.m. – Top of the Hill Back Bar

Humanities Happy Hour, from the Program in the Humanities. Jeff Sebo will discuss how to connect with others across political divides. ♦︎

November 17 – 9:00 a.m. – Friday Center

In two lectures, the Program in the Humanities hosts Politics and Violence in North Africa: Franco-Algerian Conflicts from Colonialism to the Arab Spring. ♦︎♦︎♦︎

November 17 — 1:00 p.m. — Graham Memorial Hall

The Institute for the Arts and Humanities invites the public to hear UNC alum Park Cannon ’14 talk about her career as the youngest queer woman of color member of the Georgia House of Representatives. ♦︎♦︎

November 17 – 4:30 p.m. – Wilson Library

The 2016 Charleston Lecture will be delivered by 2012-2014 NC Poet Laureate Joseph Bathanti. 

November 17 — 6:00 p.m. — FedEx Global Education Center

The Korean studies program in the Asian studies department hosts a K-Pop contest, open to all UNC students, faculty and staff. 

November 17 — 7:00 p.m. — Ackland Art Museum

The Ackland Film Forum presents Cemetery of Splendor (dir. Apichatpong Weerasethakul, 2015, Thailand). 

November 17 — 7:30 p.m. — Person Recital Hall

The music department presents a free concert featuring the UNC Harp Ensemble. 

November 17 – 8:00 p.m. – Kenan Music Building

The UNC Percussion Ensemble, directed by Justin Bunting, performs.

November 18-19 – UNC Center for School Leadership Development

The Art of Science and the Science of Art, an Adventures in Ideas seminar from the Program in Humanities. 

November 18-19 – Kenan Theatre

The sixth annual Long Story Shorts One Act Festival featuring plays written by graduating members of the Writing for the Screen and Stage Minor. 

November 18-19 – Hill Hall

UNC Opera presents Power and Politics: 2,000 Years of Current Events, Reported by Monteverdi, Mozart, Gershwin, Donizetti, and others. 

November 18 — 12:20 p.m. — FedEx Global Education Center

David Coates will discuss “Brexit in the Wake of the US Election,” part of the Center for European Studies’ Friday Lecture Series. 

November 18 — 3:00 p.m. — Begins at UNC Visitor’s Center

Using traditional storytelling, the Native Narrative campus tour will give participants an accurate and complete story of the American Indian presence on Carolina’s campus. ♦︎♦︎♦︎

November 18 — 6:15 p.m. — Hanes Art Center

Susan Gagliardi will discuss “Out of the Picture and Off the Map: A Refreshed Look at Arts Identified as Senufo” as part of the Art History Colloquium speaker series. 

November 20 — 2:00 p.m. — Sonja Haynes Stone Center

To Buy the Sun is a theatrical performance capturing the life of attorney, poet, activist, and professor Pauli Murray. 

November 20 — 2:00 p.m. — Ackland Art Museum

Enjoy live music at the Ackland Art Museum’s galleries, with music by UNC Music student and Kenan Scholar, Renée McGee. It will be accompanied by projected images from the Ackland’s collection. 

November 20 – 3:00 p.m. – Kenan Music Building
UNC Men’s and Women’s Glee Clubs, conducted by Dan Huff and Sue Klausmeyer, respectively.

November 20 – 5:00 p.m. – Hamilton Hall

Rory Bradley will discuss Christian Petzold’s Gespenster-Trilogie as part of the North Carolina German Studies Seminar Series. 

November 21 — 6:00 p.m. — Carolina Union

The third annual Evening of Indigenous Storytelling, sponsored by First Nations Graduate Circle. ♦︎

November 22 — 5:30 p.m. — Van Hecke-Wettach Hall, UNC School of Law

Native American Law Students Association hosts a film screening of Two Spirits in honor of Transgender Day of Remembrance. ♦︎♦︎

November 22- December 11 — Paul Green Theatre

The regional premiere of The May Queen by Molly Smith Metzler produced by PlayMakers Repertory Company. 

November 29 — 4:30 p.m. — Carolina Hall

Alumnus Justin Sands will discuss how the study of religion has changed his life and opened doors to an exciting international career path.  

November 30 — 12:00 p.m. — Carolina Union

Celebrate cultural diversity by enjoying tea and treats from around the world and painting your own mug. 
November 30 — 4:30 p.m. — Carolina Union

A Carolina Conversations event, discussing implicit bias and how it operates, how to recognize it, and productive ways to overcome its effects in decision making, including in hiring practices. 

December 2016

December 1 — 4:00 p.m. — FedEx Global Education Center

Wayne Karlin and Eric Henry will discuss how they first came to know Vietnamese filmmaker Trần Văn Thủy and their first impressions of his memoir. ♦︎♦︎♦︎♦︎

December 1 — 5:00 p.m. — Murphey Hall

The Department of Classics and the Department of History present a lecture by Jon Mikalson of University of Virginia. 

December 1 – 7:30 p.m. – Kenan Music Building

The Carolina Bluegrass Band performs, directed by Russell Johnson. 

December 2-3 — Multiple Venues

“Feminisms Here and Now: Communicating Alongside | Across | Against” is a conference organized by graduate students of UNC’s Department of Communication. 

December 2 — 12:20 p.m. — FedEx Global Education Center

A discussion about the price of human rights abuses, as part of the Center for European Studies’ Friday Lecture Series. ♦︎♦︎♦︎

December 2 — 3:00 p.m. — Begins at UNC Visitor’s Center

The UNC Visitor’s Center gives a Priceless Gems tour highlighting places on UNC’s campus with connections to famous writers and literary connections. 

December 2 – 4:00 p.m. – Kenan Music Building

UNC Jazz Combos performs as part of the Fred and Gail Fearing Friday Afternoon series. 

December 2 — 8:00 p.m. – Kenan Music Building

The Carolina Choir and Chamber Signers, conducted by Susan Klebanow, perform.

December 3-4 – FedEx Global Education Center

Great Cities of India, a Dialogues Seminar from the Program in the Humanities in collaboration with the Carolina Asia Center. ♦︎

December 3-4 — Memorial Hall

Carolina Ballet returns to Memorial Hall to perform the holiday classic The Nutcracker. 

December 3 – 4:00 p.m. – Kenan Music Building

The Jazz Masterclass will perform.

December 3 – 8:00 p.m. – Kenan Music Building

UNC Jazz Band, directed by Jim Ketch, perform as part of the music department’s Scholarship Series.

December 4 — 2:00 p.m. — Kenan Music Building

A free percussion recital featuring percussion professor Jason Bunting.

December 4 – 5:00 p.m. – Person Recital Hall

The UNC Guitar Ensemble, directed by Billy Stewart, performs.

December 5 — 12:20 p.m. — FedEx Global Education Center

Learn more about past global summer projects the Center for Global Initiatives has funded from the students themselves. ♦︎

December 5 — 3:30 p.m. — FedEx Global Education Center

Khatharya Um will discuss the “From The Land of Shadows: Remembering Violence and the Violence of Remembering.” ♦︎♦︎♦︎♦︎

December 5 — 4:00 p.m. — Manning Hall

Baruch J. Schwartz gives a talk titled “How the Pentateuch Was Composed: Two Floods are Better Than One.” ♦︎♦︎

December 5 — 5:00 p.m. — Hamilton Hall

Gabriele Weinberger will discuss the “Critical Reception of Etty Hillesum’s Writings (1914–1943) and the Varying Boundaries of the Canon.” ♦︎♦︎♦︎

December 5 — 6:00 p.m. — Crook’s Corner, Chapel Hill

The Institute for the Arts and Humanities hosts an evening event to raise awareness for both the Crook’s Corner Book Prize and the local emerging writers community. ♦︎

December 5 – 7:30 p.m. – Memorial Hall

The UNC Wind Ensemble and UNC Symphony Band perform as part of the music department’s Scholarship Series.

December 6 — 5:30 p.m. — Wilson Library

Gram-O-Rama: the annual comedy show that celebrates the grammar of the English language.

December 6 — 7:00 p.m. — DSI Comedy, Chapel Hill

The UNC Humanities Program and Flyleaf Books presents their annual Adult Spelling Bee. 

December 6 – 7:30 p.m. – Memorial Hall

The UNC Symphony Orchestra with Thomas Otten, piano, performs as part of music department’s Scholarship Series. 

December 7 — 5:00 p.m. — Old Well

The UNC Clef Hangers perform holiday tunes on the fall semester’s last day of classes. 

December 7 — 5:00 p.m. — Kenan Rehearsal Hall

An end-of-semester recital featuring the Department’s flute students under the direction of Brooks de Wetter-Smith. 

December 7 – 7:30 p.m. – Person Recital Hall

The University’s Chamber Players perform.

December 8 — 12:00 p.m. — Hyde Hall

The Institute for the Arts and Humanities hosts a lunchtime discussion on food insecurity in the Triangle. ♦︎

December 8 — 1:00 p.m. — Carolina Hall

Andrew Curley discusses “Energy, Water, and Tribal Sovereignty: Some Initial Thoughts on Standing Rock” in a lunchtime conversation. ♦︎♦︎♦︎♦︎

December 8 — 5:00 p.m. — Wilson Library

‘Fireside Tales to Warm Your Heart’: Storyteller and the School of Information and Library Science’s Brian Sturm will entertain with libe music, sing-alongs and stories from around the world, for children of all ages.

December 8 — 6:30 p.m. — FedEx Global Education Center

In a Carolina Seminar, Trevor Erlacher will discuss “Dmytro Dontsov, Ukrainian Nationalism, and the Entangled Eastern Front, 1914-1921.” ♦︎

December 8 – 7:30 p.m. – Memorial Hall

The China Philharmonic Orchestra, led by Maestro Long Yu, will perform including the U.S. premiere of Four Spirits for Piano and Orchestra, commissioned by Carolina Performing Arts for music assistant professor Clara Yang. ♦︎♦︎

December 9 — 6:00 p.m. — Ackland Art Museum

Stacy Lynn Waddell will speak about her newly-installed, site-specific mural Please Don’t Shoot Me, on view in the Ackland’s ART& community space. ♦︎♦︎

December 9 – 8:00 p.m. – Person Recital Hall

The UNC Baroque Ensemble and Consort of Viols, directed by Brent Wissick, performs.

December 10 — 8:00 p.m. — Memorial Hall

The Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis offers swinging performances of your favorite holiday music, arranged this season by saxophonist Sherman Irby. 

December 13 — 7:00 p.m. — Silverspot Cinema, Chapel Hill

 

Eric Muller and Heidi Kim lead a pre-show lecture with the Program in the Humanities before a special screening of the Broadway musical Allegiance starring George Takei. ♦︎♦︎♦︎♦︎♦︎

December 16 — 3:00 p.m. — Caldwell Hall

Jenann Ismael will present a Speaker Series talk. ♦︎♦︎

January

January 10 — 10:00 a.m. — Wayne Community College

Lloyd Kramer and Maximilian Owre will interpret Napoleon’s life and career, drawing on their expertise in French history to connect Napoleon’s actions to wider patterns in modern political, military, and cultural history.

January 11-15 – Kenan Theatre

Oscar Wilde’s De Profundis, adapted for the stage by Brian Mertes, explores Wilde’s infamous account of lost love and betrayal, taking us into his journey of transformation from the depths of despair to transcendent heights of forgiveness and understanding. ♦︎♦︎

January 11 — February 19 — Ackland Art Museum

For Philip Glass: Joshi / LeWitt / Close is an exhibit as a tribute for Glass’ accomplishments as a composer. ♦︎

January 13 — 4:15 p.m. — Hill Hall

Aaron Harcus will discuss tonality in 20th-century music, as part of a guest lecture in the music department. ♦︎

January 14 – 5:30 p.m. — Hill Hall

Andrew Crow of Ball State University conducts the Men’s Choral Invitational. ♦︎

January 16 – 7:00 p.m. – Sonja Haynes Stone Center

A tribute to the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. in verse and song, featuring local choirs. ♦︎♦︎♦︎

January 17 — February 8 — Hanes Art Center

“This Land is Your Land,” an exhibition of Vaughn Bell’s work in the John and June Allcott Gallery. The opening reception will be on Jan. 18. ♦︎♦︎♦︎

January 17 — 7:30 p.m. — Memorial Hall

The annual MLK Celebration Keynote Lecture provides an opportunity to hear from national thought leaders on the importance of social justice, unity, action, and/or service. This year, esteemed journalist and executive producer Soledad O’Brien will deliver the lecture. The Keynote Lecture program will also include two special presentations: MLK Scholarships and MLK Unsung Hero Awards. ♦︎♦︎♦︎♦︎

January 18 — Jordan Matthews High School, Siler City

PlayMakers Repertory Company presents a professional-quality, bare bones 90-minute production of William Shakespeare’s Measure for Measure as part of their Mobile Shakespeare program, to make his plays available, enjoyable and accessible to all. ♦︎

January 18 — 2:30 p.m. — Hanes Art Center

A workshop with Vaughn Bell, as a complement to her exhibit from Jan. 18-Feb. 8. ♦︎♦︎♦︎

January 18 — 6:00 p.m. — Top of the Hill Back Bar, Chapel Hill

Musicologist Michael Figueroa will discuss protest music as part of the the Humanities Happy Hour by the Program in the Humanities. ♦︎♦︎♦︎

January 18 – 6:30 p.m. – Campus Y

An Intersectional Look at Minority Movements: The MLK Committee of UNC-Chapel Hill will be creating a space to honor and remember the movements and leaders of the American Indian, African-American, and LatinX communities. ♦︎♦︎♦︎

January 18 – 7:00 p.m. – Sonja Haynes Stone Center

As part of the Office of Diversity and Multicultural Affairs’ weeklong celebration of Martin Luther King Jr., the Sonja Haynes Stone Center will screen Ava DuVernay’s documentary 13th. ♦︎♦︎♦︎♦︎

January 19 — IFC Residential Facility, Chapel Hill

PlayMakers Repertory Company presents a professional-quality, bare bones 90-minute production of William Shakespeare’s Measure for Measure as part of their Mobile Shakespeare program, to make his plays available, enjoyable and accessible to all. ♦︎

January 19 – 6:00 p.m. – Campus Y

Students, activists and leaders discuss social movements and what to do when change seems stagnant. ♦︎

January 20 – 4:00 p.m. – Person Recital Hall

Olivia Block visits as part of the UNC music department’s Guest Artist Lecture series. There will be an electronic music demonstration with improvisation workshop. ♦︎

January 20 – 6:00 p.m. – Sonja Haynes Stone Center

The Campus Y, CHispA, and the Women’s Center will sponsor this culminating event that brings together different groups and voices on campus in a night of celebration and unity. ♦︎

January 20 — 7:30 p.m. — Kenan Theatre

PlayMakers Repertory Company presents a professional-quality, bare bones 90-minute production of William Shakespeare’s Measure for Measure as part of their Mobile Shakespeare program, to make his plays available, enjoyable and accessible to all. ♦︎

January 20 — 8:00 p.m. — Memorial Hall

Eko Nugroho presents, Wayang Bocor, a multimedia stated work inspired by Indonesian shadow puppetry. ♦︎♦︎♦︎

January 21-May 14 — Wilson Library

World on Fire in Flames of Blood: Narratives of the Russian Revolution: Eyewitness accounts, propaganda publications, handwritten refugee journals, photographs, and literary representations of one of the most influential world events of the last century. ♦︎

January 21 — 8:00 a.m. — UNC-Chapel Hill

The Parr Center for the Ethics hosts the annual North Carolina High School Ethics Bowl. ♦︎

January 21 – 8:00 p.m. – Kenan Music Building

In a Guest Artist Recital, Olivia Block performs electronic music with live sound sculpting. ♦︎

January 24 – 5:30 p.m. – Dey Hall

Lucia Najšlová will discuss the ‘flexible solidarity’ approach advocated by Central European states in regards to EU member states and asylum-seekers. ♦︎♦︎

January 24 — 6:00 p.m. — FedEx Global Education Center

Two scholars on Middle Eastern women writers will discuss the significance of women’s writing in the contemporary Middle East and the challenges they have faced on their way. ♦︎♦︎

January 25-February 12 – Paul Green Theatre

Intimate Apparel: A compelling look at the joys and sorrows of an African-American seamstress told against the rich tapestry of 1905 New York. ♦︎

January 25 — 3:30 p.m. — Dey Hall

Heather Love discusses “The Book that Came in from the Cold: The Price of Salt” as part of English and comparative literature department’s Critical Speaker Series. ♦︎

January 26-29 – Swain Hall, Studio 6

The Swain Studio 6 Performance Series presents The Mesophase, movement-centered critical examination of the connections between human complacency and environmental devastation by Susan Ryan and Natalie Teichmann. ♦︎♦︎♦︎

January 26 — 4:30 p.m. — Southwest Regional Durham County Library

PlayMakers Repertory Company presents a professional-quality, bare bones 90-minute production of William Shakespeare’s Measure for Measure as part of their Mobile Shakespeare program, to make his plays available, enjoyable and accessible to all. ♦︎

January 26 — 3:30 p.m. — Greenlaw Hall

Heather Love discusses “The Uses of Description” as part of English and comparative literature department’s Critical Speaker Series. ♦︎

January 26 – 7:00 p.m. – Sonja Haynes Stone Center

Opening reception of “La Sombra y el Espiritu V: The Beautiful Somewhere: The Art of Philomena Williamson” with an artist talk by Williamson. ♦︎

January 27 — April 9 — Ackland Art Museum

Fever Within: The Art of Ronald Lockett, curated by American studies professor Bernie Herman, ends its traveling exhibition at the Ackland Art Museum.

January 27-28 — North Carolina Museum of Art

A two-day new scholars conference explores how innovative scholarship and new narratives can help expand the larger discipline of British studies. ♦︎♦︎

January 27 – 4:15 p.m. – Person Recital Hall

Diane Pecknold, from the University of Louisville, will be a guest lecturer as part of the Carolina Symposia for Music and Culture series. ♦︎♦︎

January 27 – 8:00 p.m. — Hill Hall

Topeng Losari mask dancer Nani performs as part of the Carolina Performing Arts’ Sacred/Secular: A Sufi Journey series. ♦︎♦︎♦︎

January 28 – 9:00 a.m. – FedEx Global Education Center

Morgan Pitelka and David Ambaras consider Japan’s complex relations with China, Korea, and others in the Asia-Pacific in the sixteenth century and twentieth centuries. ♦︎♦︎

January 28 – 8:00 p.m. – Hill Hall

Pianist Aaron Likness plays from piano sonatas of Charles Ives. ♦︎

January 29 — 2:00 p.m. — Ackland Art Museum

Bernie Herman leads a tour of the Fever Within: The Art of Ronald Lockett exhibition. ♦︎♦︎

January 29 – 3:00 p.m. – Hill Hall

The UNC Cello Choir performs, directed by Brent Wissick. ♦︎

January 30 — April 30 — Wilson Library

Charles Scott and the Integration of Varsity Sports at UNC: A small exhibit of photos, newspaper articles, documents from the University Archives and old basketball programs places Scott’s career in context by looking at the integration of the student body at Carolina and of Chapel Hill in the 1960s. ♦︎♦︎♦︎

January 30 – 7:00 p.m. – Gerrard Hall

Singer-songwriter Psoy Korolenko and historian Anna Shternshis (University of Toronto) bring to life “lost” Yiddish songs of the World War II in this all-new concert and lecture program. ♦︎♦︎

January 31 – 7:00 p.m. – Person Recital Hall

Join the music department for a recital called “Work, Play, and Spirit Songs for Tenor and Violoncello” featuring Adam Mitchell, tenor, and Timothy Holley, violoncello. ♦︎

January 31 – 7:00 p.m. – Sonja Haynes Stone Center

Iris Morales gives the Writer’s Discussion Series lecture. ♦︎♦︎

 

February

February 1 — 3:30 p.m. — Greenlaw Hall

April Ayers Lawson will give a reading as part of the English and comparative literature department’s Kenan Visiting Writer Reading series. ♦︎

February 1 — 7:30 p.m. — Memorial Hall

The Bruckner Orchester Linz honors performs works by Philip Glass, as part of the Carolina Performing Arts “Glass at 80” celebration. ♦︎

February 2-4 – 8:00 p.m. – Kenan Theatre

The Kenan Theatre Company presents the Me Too Monologues, student written works about identity and life as a student here at Carolina. ♦︎♦︎♦︎♦︎♦︎

February 2 — 12:30 p.m. — New East

Gu Xiaokun will discuss the history of urban revival in Shanghai, outline policy tools and identify new trends in urban revival. ♦︎♦︎♦︎

February 2 — 7:00 p.m. — Sonja Haynes Stone Center

Join keynote speaker Brittany Packnett, VP of National Community Alliances at Teach for America and one of Time‘s 12 New Faces of Black Leadership, to learn about her journey in becoming an activist for racial and social equity. A Black History Month event. ♦︎

February 3 — 8:00 p.m. — Hill Hall

The Carolina Women’s Choral Showcase.  ♦︎

February 6 — 7:30 p.m. — Hill Hall

Ten pianists perform this contemplative portrait of Philip Glass’s personal soundscape over the course of two decades. ♦︎

February 7 — 12:30 p.m. — Sonja Haynes Stone Center

Panelists Keisha Khan-Perry, Sharon Holland and Pat Parker will discuss the relevance and significance of black feminist through and activism, in the U.S. and globally, in the current political moment. A Black History Month event. ♦︎♦︎

February 7 — 12:30 p.m. — Hyde Hall

Kevin Trapani discusses his career and leading a business that is powerful force to right wrongs and bring about positive social change. ♦︎♦︎

February 7 – 4:30 p.m. – Flyleaf Books

Michael Gerhardt will take an up-to-the-minute look at the confirmation process for the next Supreme Court justice. ♦︎

February 7 — 7:30 p.m. — Memorial Hall

Dance, by Lucinda Childs, was created with composer Philip Glass and visual artist Sol LeWitt, whose black-and-white film version of the dance hovers over the performers. ♦︎

February 8 — 5:30 p.m. — Wilson Library

This presentation will examine the long- and short-term causes of the February Revolution of 1917 that toppled 300 years of Romanov rule, the social polarization that unfolded afterward, aggravated by the consequences of an unpopular war, and the reasons why the Bolsheviks came to power and held on to it. ♦︎♦︎

February 8 — 7:00 p.m. — Sonja Haynes Stone Center

Brenda E. Stevenson delivers the 13th Annual African American History Month Lecture with a talk titled “When Do Black Female Lives Matter? Contested Assaults, Murders and American Race Riots.” ♦︎

February 9 – 9:00 a.m. — Friday Center

Lloyd Kramer will analyze how opposing ideologies or “isms” emerged and why they continue to elicit public passions and anxieties. ♦︎♦︎♦︎

February 9 – 5:30 p.m. – FedEx Global Education Center

Tom Kelley will discuss the Rwanda government’s use of legal and extra-legal means to control memory and history in their country. ♦︎♦︎♦︎

February 9 — 6:00 p.m. — FedEx Global Education Center

Freelance foreign correspondent Reese Erlich discusses the growth of Syrian extremist rebel groups, the state of the Assad regime, foreign intervention and the failure of US policy. ♦︎♦︎♦︎

February 9 — 7:30 p.m. — Memorial Hall

The Kronos Quartet performs from pieces of Philip Glass’ score of Dracula, as the film plays along. ♦︎

February 10-12 — Swain Hall, Studio 6

Spoken Word/Spoken Justice: A festival of spoken word performance from the UNC Process Series. ♦︎♦︎♦︎♦︎

February 10-24 – Hanes Art Center

“Becky Brown, Yes You” exhibit in the John and June Allcott Gallery. Brown is the 2015-17 Visiting Resident Artist at UNC. ♦︎

February 10 — 3:00 p.m. — Begins at UNC Visitor’s Center

A distinctive walking tour on the African-American history of the University, with emphasis on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. ♦︎♦︎♦︎

February 10 — 4:15 p.m. — Person Recital Hall

Emma Dillon from King’s College London will give a lecture as a part of the Carolina Symposia in Music and Culture. ♦︎

February 10 — 5:00 p.m. — Ackland Art Museum 

A public celebration of Fever Within: The Art of Ronald Lockett, with an artwalk. ♦︎♦︎

February 10 — 8:00 p.m. — Memorial Hall

Philip Glass and Laurie Anderson present share musical moments and poetry readings followed by a selection of Glass songs featuring lyrics by 13th-century Sufi poet Rumi. ♦︎♦︎

February 11 – 9:15 a.m. – Friday Center

This interdisciplinary seminar will show how novel approaches to scholarship of the Medieval Era are yielding new insights on the era and on our world today. ♦︎♦︎♦︎

February 12 — 5:00 p.m. — Hamilton Hall

This perspective sheds new light on why so many ordinary people supported the racist imperialism of the Nazis, then embraced anti-Fascist alternatives and finally sought to make sense of their choices. ♦︎♦︎♦︎

February 13 — 4:00 p.m. — Person Recital Hall

Tony Arnold, soprano, and Jacob Greenberg, piano, will give a lecture as part of the Conversations in Modern Music series. ♦︎

February 13 — 7:00 p.m. — Friday Center

Jeffrey Shandler will explore the USC Shoah Foundation’s Visual History Archive—the largest collection of videotaped interviews with Holocaust survivors—which includes hundreds of interviews conducted entirely or partially in Yiddish. ♦︎♦︎♦︎♦︎♦︎

February 14 – 4:30 p.m. – Flyleaf Books

A Carolina’s Great Teachers event, looking at the way 19th-century novelists used prostitution as a way to make sense of Paris in their works. ♦︎♦︎

February 14 — 7:30 p.m. — Person Recital Hall

Tony Arnold, soprano, and Jacob Greenberg, piano, will perform a recital as part of the Conversations in Modern Music series. They will play music by Helmut Lachenmann and Olivier Messiaen. ♦︎

February 15 — 4:00 p.m. — Hill Hall

Carolina Jazz Festival event: UNC Jazz Combos concert with Dayna Stephens, tenor-saxophone. ♦︎

February 15 — 5:00 p.m. — Ram’s Head Dining Hall

This yearly tradition features foods inspired by African-American history and culture. This year’s theme is Mardi Gras. A Black History Month event. ♦︎♦︎

February 15 – 6:00 p.m. – Top of the Hill Back Bar

Elizabeth Greig will discuss the status of humanitarian aid in Haiti after recent disasters. ♦︎♦︎♦︎♦︎

February 15 — 6:00 p.m. — Campus Y

In a collaboration between the Parr Center for Ethics and the Campus Y, Maryse Mitchell-Brody will present “Working Ourselves Out of a Job: Liberation and the Non-Profit Industrial Complex.” ♦︎♦︎

February 16 — 3:00 p.m. — Sonja Haynes Stone Center

Andrea Benjamin will discuss her study of whether and how Blacks and Latinos in Durham, North Carolina achieve participation in the city’s dominant governing coalition. ♦︎♦︎

February 16 — 4:30 p.m. — Love House and Hutchins Forum

Julie Reed delivers the Hutchins Lecture, discussing why 19th-century Cherokee people chose to surrender aspects of their holistic system of care for others rooted within a matrilineal clan system and governed by local community obligations and clan responsibilities that stretched across towns in favor of nationally administered social services by the Cherokee Nation to individual citizens. ♦︎♦︎♦︎

February 16 — 5:30 p.m. — Hamilton Hall

This lecture offers a rare portrait of the highest-ranking women in each armed group, August La Torre (Shining Path) and Lucero Cumpa (MRTA). ♦︎♦︎

February 16 — 6:00 p.m. — Caldwell Hall

The Parr Center for Ethics hosts a debate between Shelly Kagan and Walter Sinnott-Armstrong about the ethics of boycotts. ♦︎♦︎♦︎

February 16 — 7:00 p.m. — Graham Memorial

Conductor and musicologist Leon Botstein will deliver the lecture “Sounding Forms: What Music and Its Practice Reveal about Modern European History” for the Mary Stevens Reckford Memorial Lecture in European Studies. ♦︎♦︎

February 16 — 7:30 p.m. — Hill Hall

Carolina Jazz Festival event: UNC Faculty Jazz Ensemble and Charanga Carolina perform. ♦︎

February 16 – 7:30 p.m. – Historic PlayMakers Theatre

Carolina Performing Arts and PlayMakers Repertory Company collaborate for a staged reading: The Who and the What by Ayad Akhtar. ♦︎♦︎♦︎

February 17-18 – UNC campus

John Jeffries Martin and Lloyd Kramer will offer historical analysis of how European people and cultures interacted with the wider world, created the identities and systems of modernity, and then responded to anxieties about Europe’s declining global influence in the twentieth century. ♦︎♦︎

February 17 — 1:25 p.m. — Hill Hall

Carolina Jazz Festival event: Open rehearsal of UNC Jazz Band with Dayna Stephens. ♦︎

February 17 — 3:00 p.m. — Begins at UNC Visitor’s Center

A distinctive walking tour on the African-American history of the University, with emphasis on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. ♦︎♦︎♦︎

February 17 — 3:00 p.m. — Begins at UNC Visitor’s Center

Using traditional storytelling, the Native Narrative campus tour will give participants an accurate and complete story of the American Indian presence on Carolina’s campus. ♦︎♦︎♦︎

February 17 — 3:00 p.m. — Morehead Planetarium

Hildegard of Bingen’s model of the universe, a full-dome digital presentation with music, created by Christian Jara and Margot Fassler, with a soundtrack by musicians from the Notre Dame Program in Sacred Music. ♦︎

February 17 — 3:30 p.m. — Dey Hall

Local experts in English, Linguistics, American Studies, and Speech and Hearing Sciences about the conflicts and coexistence of language diversity and linguistic standardization in academia. ♦︎♦︎

February 17 — 7:00 p.m. — Sonja Haynes Stone Center

The Stone Center will present Power! Stokely Carmichael, a play written and performed by actor and playwright Meshaun Labrone and directed by Jennifer Knight. ♦︎♦︎♦︎♦︎

February 17 — 8:00 p.m. — Memorial Hall

Carolina Jazz Festival event: Marcus Roberts and the Modern Jazz generation concert. ♦︎

February 18 — 8:30 a.m. — Multiple Venues

Carolina Jazz Festival event: NC Regional Essentially Ellington High School Jazz festival. ♦︎

February 18 — 10 a.m. — FedEx Global Education Center

Join the Curriculum in Global Studies for a day of round-table dialogue with researchers, community practitioners and policymakers working on key topics of immigration policy reform and refugee resettlement and services. ♦︎♦︎

February 18 – 3:30 p.m. – Morehead Planetarium and Science Center

Become familiar with the current night sky through stories that various African cultures have told about the Moon, planets, and stars. ♦︎♦︎

February 18 — 8:00 p.m. — Hill Hall

Carolina Jazz Festival event: The UNC Jazz Band performs in a scholarship benefit concert. ♦︎

February 19 — 2:00 p.m. — Ackland Art Museum

The North Carolina Central University Choir will perform as part of the Ackland’s Music in the Galleries. ♦︎

February 19 — 7:30 p.m. — Hill Hall

Join the music department for an afternoon celebrating the 450th birthday of Italian composer Claudio Monteverdi. ♦︎♦︎

February 20 — 12:20 p.m. — Wilson Library

Heidi Kim provides an introduction to the rich history of Asians and Asian-Americans at UNC and the unveiling of a week-long exhibit at Wilson Library, kicking off Asia Week 2017. ♦︎♦︎

February 20 — 7:30 p.m. — Memorial Hall

Evan Feldman and Arris Golden conduct the UNC Wind Ensemble and UNC Symphony Band. ♦︎

February 21 — 5:30 p.m. — FedEx Global Education Center

Learn Vietnamese, Thai and Bahasa Indonesia in free three-part workshops at UNC-Chapel Hill. This event is part of Asia Week 2017. ♦︎♦︎

February 21 — 6:00 p.m. — Hanes Art Center

Traditional visual artist Tim Portlock delivers the Hanes Visiting Art Lecture. ♦︎

February 21 – 6:00 p.m. – Varsity Theatre

Join the Program in the Humanities and the General Alumni Association in walking the Carolina Blue carpet at the Varsity Theatre for an Oscars Preview Event, with insight from film experts Dana Coen and Rachel Schaevitz. ♦︎

February 21 — 7:00 p.m. — Hill Hall

This recital-workshop explores the wealth of repertoire for historical flutes by J.S. Bach and his composer sons. ♦︎

February 22 — 10:00 a.m. — FedEx Global Education Center

Geshe Palden Sangpo from the Kadampa Center for the Practice of Tibetan Buddhism in the Gelugpa Tradition will create a sand mandala in the FedEx Global Education Center lobby as part of Asia Week 2017. 

February 23-24 – Historic PlayMakers Theatre

Bayou Blues dives deep into the consciousness of a black girl’s pursuit to find air amidst the drowning waves of colorism in New Orleans. ♦︎♦︎♦︎

February 23-27 – Kenan Theatre

The Kenan Theatre Company’s production of Rooms, a “Dance-Drama” was created through a Fall 2016 course taught by Lecturer Heather Tatreau that focuses on feminist literature. ♦︎♦︎♦︎♦︎

February 23 – 9:00 a.m. – Friday Center

Part Two of “The Emergence and Enduring Influence of the Western ‘Isms’” with Lloyd Kramer. ♦︎♦︎♦︎

February 23 – 4:30 p.m. – Carolina Union

The next Carolina Conversations will discuss “First Amendment Protected Speech.” ♦︎♦︎

February 23 – 6:00 p.m. – Caldwell Hall

The Parr Center for the Ethics presents Emily Baxter, director of We Are All Criminals. We Are All Criminals which seeks to challenge society’s perception of what it means to be a criminal and how much weight a record should be given, when truly – we are all criminals. ♦︎♦︎♦︎

February 23 – 7:30 p.m. – Hill Hall

Free film screening of The Defiant Requiem, a documentary about Rafael Schächter, a brilliant, young Czech conductor who was arrested and sent to Terezín Concentration Camp in 1941. 

February 24-26 — Swain Hall, Studio 6

Race and Waste in an Alumnium Town, part of the Swain Studio Six Performance Series, is a performance of dramatized oral histories of industrial workers during a time of segregation in Baden, NC. ♦︎♦︎♦︎

February 24 — 8:30 a.m. — FedEx Global Education Center

The 2017 UNC-System Asia Scholar Network Conference, part of Asia Week 2017. ♦︎♦︎

February 24 — 3:00 p.m. — Begins at UNC’s Visitor’s Center

A distinctive walking tour on the African-American history of the University, with emphasis on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. ♦︎♦︎♦︎

February 24 — 5:00 p.m. — Caldwell Hall

The Parr Center for the Ethics hosts “Philosophy at the Movies” with Waiting for Superman. Macy Salzberger will lead a discussion that aims to address the following questions. ♦︎♦︎♦︎

February 25 — 9:15 a.m. — Archie K. Davis Conference Center

The program in the humanities hosts a conference on Southern American culture and memory. ♦︎♦︎

February 25 — 11:00 a.m. — FedEx Global Education Center

UNC-Chapel Hill’s first ever Asian Culture Festival, which will include tables, activities, presentations, workshops and dances from fifteen of UNC-Chapel Hill’s 40+ Asia-related student organizations. ♦︎ 

February 25 — 7:30 p.m. — Hill Hall

Spectrum Concert: UNC music students and faculty celebrate the grand opening of Moeser Auditorium. 

February 26 — 3:00 p.m. — Hill Hall

Brahms Sonatas for violin and piano with Nichiolas DiEugenio and Mimi Solomon. ♦︎

February 27 — March 3 — Hanes Art Center

Double Wide: Petere Mystica Saecularia is a one week MFA Thesis Exhibition with work by Louis Watts. ♦︎

February 27 — 3:30 p.m. — Greenlaw Hall

“Responsible Meat: Sourcing in the 21st Century” Panel discussion with Hanes Writer-in-Residence Ted Conover. ♦︎♦︎

February 27 — 6:00 p.m. — Caldwell Hall

Jennifer Morton will give a talk for the philosophy, politics and economics minor. ♦︎

February 28 – 4:30 p.m. – Flyleaf Books

Presidential historian William Leuchtenburg shares his insights and wide experience as we look back on the recent changes and long-term continuities in American political life. ♦︎

February 28 — 7:30 p.m. — Genome Sciences Building Auditorium

Distinguished Writer-in-Residence Ted Conover will deliver the Frank B. Hanes Writer-in-Residence Reading. ♦︎♦︎

March

March 1-19 — Paul Green Theatre

PlayMakers presents Twelfth Night. The Bard’s riotous romp affirms the power of love to transform loss into hope, with every word, wink and wooing a sheer delight. ♦︎

March 1 — 11:15 a.m. — Phillips Hall

Willie J. Griffin presents a colloquium on the role of the mid-twentieth century Black Press played in spurring the modern Civil Rights Movement forward. ♦︎♦︎

March 1 — 3:30 p.m. — Greenlaw Hall

“Writing about the ‘Other:’ The Ethics of Documenting” Panel discussion with Hanes Writer-in-Residence Ted Conover. ♦︎♦︎

March 1 – 4:30 p.m. – Flyleaf Books

This talk will explore these differences which have important ethical and practical implications for contemporary Europe as it contends with an unprecedented flow of immigrants. ♦︎♦︎♦︎♦︎

March 1 — 7:30 p.m. — Person Recital Hall

Guest Artists Recital with Stephanie Tingler, soprano, and Martha Thomas, piano. ♦︎

March 2 – 4:30 p.m. – Love House & Hutchins Forum

The Center for the Study of the American South hosts a discussion of the current state and politics of the death penalty. This program is offered in conjunction with the new Process Series production Count. ♦︎♦︎

March 2 – 5:00 p.m. – Campus Y

The Parr Center for Ethics and the Campus Y, Maryse Mitchell-Brody will present “Working Ourselves Out of a Job: Liberation and the Non-Profit Industrial Complex.” ♦︎♦︎

March 2 — 5:00 p.m. — Peabody Hall

Cynthia Hahn will discuss “Relics and Reliquaries, Discourses of Power and Containment” as part of the Art History Colloquium series. ♦︎♦︎

March 2 — 6:30 p.m. — FedEx Global Education Center

Tarik Amer discusses the making of spy Max Otto von Stierlitz (“Shtirlits”) as a persistent icon of popular culture. ♦︎♦︎♦︎♦︎

March 2 — 7:00 p.m. — Carolina Student Union

Mariposa & the Saint: From Solitary, a Play Through Letters. ♦︎♦︎♦︎

March 2 — 7:30 p.m. — Memorial Hall

Shahid Nadeem’s spellbinding play Dara tells the dramatic story of Dara Shikoh—eldest son of Mughal Emperor Shah Jahan—who was imprisoned and executed by his younger brother Aurangzeb. ♦︎♦︎♦︎♦︎♦︎

March 2 – 7:30 p.m. – Hill Hall

The UNC Symphony Orchestra presents a concert with Carolina Choir and the winners of the annual UNC Concerto Competition: Luke Boehm (bass-baritone), Shafali Jalota (soprano), and Hannah Lohr-Pearson (cello). ♦︎

March 3-4 — Swain Hall, Studio 6

The Process Series presents Count by Lynden Harris/Hidden Voices, a performance based on writings and conversations with prisoners throughout the U.S. ♦︎♦︎♦︎♦︎

March 3-4 — Hyde Hall

Ancient Foodways Conference: this conference, social and natural scientists grapple with the task of integrating multiple threads of material data involving food with the behaviors that generated them in past societies. ♦︎♦︎♦︎

March 3-26 — Hanes Art Center

“Subject to Change” exhibit featuring work by the art department’s undergraduate award winners. ♦︎

March 3 – 1:00 p.m. – National Humanities Center

The National Humanities Center presents the second conference in the series examining the relation between rock and roll and literature. ♦︎

March 3 — 3:00 p.m. — Begins at UNC Visitor’s Center

Taylor Livingston leads a Priceless Gems Tour, “Digging in Our Heels, Angels on Campus: The Herstory of Women on Campus.” ♦︎♦︎♦︎♦︎

March 3 — 4:00 p.m. — Murphey Hall

“Whose Classics? Diversity, Representation, and the Ancient World Today” features snapshot talks by classics faculty and graduate students which offer glimpses of the diversity of the ancient Mediterranean world and the courses in the classics department. ♦︎♦︎♦︎

March 3 – 7:30 p.m. – Hill Hall

This William S. Newman Series Artists Concert features world-renowned piano professor Stefan Litwin. ♦︎

March 3 – 8:00 p.m. – Memorial Hall

Steve Earle performs, as a tie-in to the National Humanities Center’s Novel Sounds conference♦︎

March 4-5 — FedEx Global Education Center

The Jewish Food in the Global South symposium will explore the historical trends and current cultural practices surrounding “Jewish” food in and of the American South. ♦︎♦︎♦︎

March 4 – 9:15 a.m. – TBD

Gerhard Weinberg will discuss America’s engagement in World War I in an Adventures in Ideas seminar. ♦︎♦︎

March 4 — 11:00 a.m. — Fetzer Gym

The American Indian Center encourages you attend this year’s powwow and explore the rich culture of Indigenous Peoples in North Carolina, many of which are also part of the UNC campus community. ♦︎♦︎♦︎♦︎

March 5 — 3:00 p.m. — The William and Ida Friday Center

The Langston Hughes Project is a multimedia concert performance of Langston Hughes’ kaleidoscopic jazz poem suite, featuring the Ron McCurdy Quartet. ♦︎♦︎♦︎

March 5 – 3:00 p.m. – Hill Hall

Schubert’s Die Winterreise performed by Marc Callahan, baritone, and Thomas Otten, piano, part of the William S. Newman Series and Moeser Favorites Series. ♦︎

March 5 – 8:00 p.m. – Memorial Hall

As part of the “Glass at 80” celebration, Heroes Tribute: A Celebration of the Music of Philip Glass, David Bowie, and Brian Eno, featuring a Merge Records Group and the UNC Symphony Orchestra. ♦︎

March 6-10 — Hanes Art Center

Reliquarium (pine boxes) is an installation of paintings which imagines the transition into death as an absurd, tempestuous process. This exhibit part of the art department’s MFA Thesis Exhibition, featuring work by Wayne Marcelli. ♦︎

March 6 – 4:30 p.m. – Davis Library

The Center for the Study of the American South presents the Chandler Lecture in Southern Business History, delivered by Trevon D. Logan and Caitlin Rosenthal. ♦︎♦︎

March 8 – 12:15 p.m. – FedEx Global Education Center

What Diversity Sounds Like hosts a discussion for students about dialects and implicit social biases. ♦︎♦︎♦︎

March 8 — 4:30 p.m. — Flyleaf Books

This talk will question those assumptions by exploring the extent to which difficulties in Muslim integration reflect common challenges among immigrant communities of any type, and explore the ramifications of thinking about the Muslim community in either religious or immigration terms. ♦︎♦︎♦︎♦︎

March 8 – 5:00 p.m. – Hyde Hall

Sharon Cameron, William Kenan Jr. Professor Emerita at Johns Hopkins University, will deliver a lecture on “Tolstoy, Bresson, and the Ground of the Ethical.” ♦︎♦︎

March 8 – 7:30 p.m. – Hill Hall

Mark Padmore, tenor, and Jonathan Biss, piano, perform. ♦︎

March 9 – 5:00 p.m. – Murphey Hall

The AIA Triangle Society presents a lecture by Professor Jennifer Gates-Foster of UNC-Chapel Hill. ♦︎

March 9 — 5:00 p.m. — Wilson Library

Ronald D. Cohen, author and professor emeritus of history at Indiana University Northwest, will deliver the talk “Depression Folk: Grassroots Music and Left-Wing Politics in 1930s America.” Following the lecture, old-time string band The Down Hill Strugglers will perform. ♦︎

March 10 – 7:00 p.m. – Person Recital Hall

Marissa Martins and Mac McClure will perform a recital of Spanish music. ♦︎♦︎

March 11 — 9:00 a.m. — FedEx Global Education Center

A Dialogues Seminar from the Program in the Humanities about how past and present climate changes have influenced human beings and the natural environment. ♦︎♦︎

March 13 — 7:00 p.m. — Silverspot Cinema

Join the UNC Program in the Humanities at Silverspot Cinemas for a pre-movie spaghetti dinner and discussion before a screening of The Good, The Bad and the Ugly. ♦︎

March 17 – 6:30 p.m. – The William and Ida Friday Center

Lisbeth Firmin shares her inspiration behind her urban artwork which explores the relationship between people and their urban environment. ♦︎

March 18 — 9:00 a.m. — FedEx Global Education Center

Archaeologist Jennifer Gates-Foster will discuss how life in Egypt changed during the era of Greek and Roman rule (4th century BC-7th century AD). ♦︎♦︎♦︎

March 19 — 2:00 p.m. — Ackland Art Museum

Gospel singer Mary D. Williams will perform as part of the Ackland’s Music in the Galleries series, tying into the Fever Within exhibition. ♦︎

March 20 – 1:25 p.m. – Greenlaw Hall

Lisa Yarger will discuss “Lovie: The Story of a Southern Midwife and an Unlikely Friendship.” ♦︎

March 20 — 5:30 p.m. — Dey Hall

Paul Lerner will discuss the intertwined histories of German Jews and consumer culture, focusing on department stores in pre-Nazi Germany and advertising, malls, and amusement parks in post-war America, showing how Jewish immigrants from Germany and Austria shaped American consumer culture in the 20th century. ♦︎♦︎

March 20 – 5:30 p.m. – Flyleaf Books

Bill Corcoran, an expert in refugee aid and development in the Middle East, will highlight the ways we can respond to ensure a safe, secure and dignified future.  ♦︎♦︎♦︎

March 21 — 12:30 p.m. — Hyde Hall

The Parr Center hosts Ethics Around the Table, with Rachel Shaevitz of the Program in Humanities and Human Values. ♦︎♦︎♦︎♦︎

March 21 – 7:30 p.m. – Person Recital Hall

Christopher Hutton, cello, from Furman University will perform a solo cello recital. ♦︎

March 22 — September 17 — Ackland Art Museum

Los Trompos is a large-scale, interactive installation of much-larger-than-life spinning tops (trompos) in a variety of colors and shapes. Los Trompos will be at the Ackland through Sept. 17.

March 22 — 4:00 p.m. — Dey Hall

“The Piety of Personal and the Personality of Power.” The talk will address the “post-truth” regime associated with the Trump phenomenon, avoiding traditional theories of identification and ideology in favor of an affect-based approach necessitating a rethinking of the nature of the person. ♦︎♦︎

March 22 — 5:30 p.m. — Ackland Art Museum

Lynne Cooke will deliver a guest lecture at the Ackland Art Museum, to tie into the Fever Within exhibition. ♦︎

March 22 — 6:00 p.m. — Back Bar, Top of the Hill

In this Humanities Happy Hour event, Charles Kurzman will discuss why American fears of Islamic terrorism are often exaggerated. ♦︎♦︎♦︎

March 22 – 6:30 p.m. – Graham Memorial

Scottish Tales and Tunes: An evening of traditional Scottish Gaelic oral stories and music with Michael Newton. ♦︎♦︎

March 23-24 — 7:30 p.m. — Memorial Hall

A program performed by the Martha Graham Dance Company features work by Sidi Larbi Cherkaoui inspired by Sufi poetry and accompanied by Turkish traditional music, in connection with Sacred/Secular: A Sufi Journey♦︎♦︎

March 23 — 5:00 p.m. — Dey Hall

Edouard Louis will deliver the lecture, The End of Eddy, which will focus on the language of violence as well as the social, literary and artistic effects of violence in literature. ♦︎

March 23 — 6:00 p.m. — Caldwell Hall

“For Their Eyes Only: Ag Gag Laws, Body Cam Laws, & the Right to Know,” a detailed examination and short talks on these laws, with a panel discussion and audience Q&A. ♦︎♦︎

March 24-25 — Caldwell Hall, Graham Memorial Hall

African, African American, & Diaspora Studies Undergraduate Research Conference will include the Dunbar-Stone lecture and research presentations by students. ♦︎♦︎♦︎♦︎♦︎

March 24 — 4:00 p.m. — Phillips Hall

Hasan Elahi and Hannah Feldman will give keynote addresses at the third annual Art Student Graduate Organization Symposium. ♦︎♦︎♦︎♦︎

March 24 — 5:00 p.m. — Caldwell Hall

Catharine Newbury will discuss “Infra-Politics in Rwanda: Rural Activism Before and After the Genocide,” for the Dunbar-Stone Lecture, which also opens the Africna, African American & Diaspora Studies Undergraduate Research Conference. ♦︎♦︎♦︎♦︎

March 24 – 7:30 p.m. – Hill Hall

Guest artist Karen Walwyn, piano, gives a masterclass and recital. ♦︎

March 26 – 2:00 p.m. – Person Recital Hall

The music department presents the third annual concert featuring the department’s 1842 Pleyel piano. ♦︎

March 26 – 6:00 p.m. – Hill Hall

New Music for Marimba by Juan Álamo. ♦︎

March 27-31 — Hanes Art Center

Uncertain Becomings explores MFA graduate student Vanessa Murray’s interest in the physical presence of painting. ♦︎

March 27 – 1:25 p.m. – Greenlaw Hall

Victor Bouveron will give a talk as part of the department of American studies colloquium series. ♦︎

March 28 — 5:30 p.m. — FedEx Global Education Center

Janet Browne of Harvard University will deliver the 2017 Polanyi Lecture entitled, “Rethinking Darwinian Revolution.” ♦︎

March 28 — 6:00 p.m. — Hanes Art Center

Hanes Visiting Artist Lecture with Becky Brown, who works between painting, drawing, sculpture and installation using found images, objects and texts. ♦︎

March 28 — 7:30 p.m. — Hill Hall

Sonolumen is a multimedia electro-acoustic-video excursion into the concrete and abstract. ♦︎

March 29 — 4:30 p.m. — Flyleaf Books

This talk will trace the history of the Rohingya people in Myanmar, and provide context for an often overlooked contemporary ethnic conflict and refugee situation. ♦︎♦︎♦︎♦︎

March 29 — 5:00 p.m. — Davis Library

The opening reception for the Student Action with Farmworkers’ “More Than One Story | Más que una historia” exhibition.  ♦︎♦︎♦︎♦︎

March 30 — April 1 — TBD

The 23rd annual Carolina Conference for Romance Studies. ♦︎♦︎♦︎♦︎♦︎

March 30 — April 2 — Swain Hall

Capriccio is a moving collage of dream-images. This devised performance explores the works and methods of U.S. artist Joseph Cornell. Part of the Swain Studio Six Performance Series. ♦︎

March 30 — 3:30 p.m. — Greenlaw Hall

James McMichael will give the Armfield Poetry Reading. ♦︎

March 30 — 4:30 p.m. — Hyde Hall

The Institute for the Arts and Humanities invites you to learn about the faculty support opportunities they offer, and to celebrate the recently published books and digital demonstrations of Faculty Fellows and Academic Leadership Fellows with a wine reception. ♦︎♦︎

March 30 — 5:30 p.m. — Love House & Hutchins Forum

Triangle-based quintet Counterclockwise String Band performs at the Love House for Music on the Porch. ♦︎

March 30 – 7:00 p.m. – The Sonja Haynes Stone Center

Writer’s Discussion Series and African Diaspora Lecture by Daniel O. Sayers. ♦︎♦︎

March 30 — 7:30 p.m. — Hill Hall

Hear the 360ᵒ Jazz Initiative Ensemble perform in its annual concert. The ensemble features UNC jazz faculty and original compositions from the ensemble and from the winners of the 2016 Call for Scores. ♦︎

March 31-April 1 – Hyde Hall

The history department presents a conference, “Culinary Nationalism in Asia.” ♦︎♦︎

March 31 — April 1 — Multiple Venues

“Materia – A Temporal Collaboration at Three Atypical Sites” is a UNC MFA exhibition. ♦︎

March 31 – April 2 — Person Recital Hall, Hill Hall

The music department and Carolina Center for Jewish Studies will bring a symposium about the Defiant Requiem, titled “Performing Commemoration: Musical Reenactment and the Politics of Trauma.” ♦︎♦︎♦︎

March 31 — 3:00 p.m. — Begins at UNC Visitor’s Center

The UNC Visitor’s Center gives a Priceless Gems tour highlighting places on UNC’s campus with connections to famous writers and literary connections. ♦︎

March 31 — 8:00 p.m. — Memorial Hall

In “Sounds of Kolachi,” a supergroup of vocalists and instrumentalists from Karachi (formerly known as Kolachi) mixes classical, avant-garde, jazz and rock music. ♦︎♦︎

April

April 1 — 8:00 p.m. — Carmichael Arena

The Carolina Union Activities Board (CUAB) presents their annual Jubilee concert featuring 2 Chainz. ♦︎

April 3-7 — Hanes Art Center

A one-week exhibit of Lamar Whidbee’s MFA thesis, “Dear Son…” ♦︎

April 3 — 6:00 p.m. — Caldwell Hall

Join the Parr Center for Ethics for a discussion about the ethics of gun control in the United States. ♦︎

April 4 – 4:30 p.m. – Hyde Hall

The Institute for the Arts and Humanities Academic Leadership Program hosts this free film screening and discussion open to the faculty, students, staff, and the public. The 2016 documentary Starving the Beast focuses on the struggle at colleges where political and market-oriented forces push to disrupt and reform. ♦︎

April 4 — 7:00 p.m. — Silverspot Cinema

Carolina’s Public Humanities partners with Silverspot Cinema for a national screening and day of dialogue featuring George Orwell’s 1984. Rachel Schaevitz will introduce the film and Dr. Lloyd Kramer will lead a community discussion on how films and the humanities help us think about and analyze public issues. ♦︎♦︎

April 5-29 — Paul Green Theatre

PlayMakers presents My Fair Lady. Be transported by glorious music and cheer Eliza on as she grabs her chance for reinvention, breaking barriers and changing the lives of Henry Higgins and everyone she meets along the way. ♦︎

April 5 — 12:30 p.m. — Hyde Hall

A Difficult Conversations event: Gender Equity in Higher Education, hosted by the Institute for the Arts and Humanities and the Parr Center for the Ethics. ♦︎♦︎♦︎

April 5 — 4:30 p.m. — Flyleaf Books

This talk will focus on how immigrant rights in the United States are dependent on place. ♦︎♦︎♦︎

April 5 – 6:00 p.m. – Hanes Art Center

Stephen J. Campbell will discuss “The Force of Images in Fifteenth Century Italy: Andrea Mantegna” as part of the Bettie Allison Rand Lecture Series. ♦︎♦︎

April 6-7 – Multiple Venues

The department of African, African American and diaspora studies will host their annual Global Africana Conference, “Black Feminist Futures: Re-envisioning Gender & Sexuality in Global Black Communities.” Keynote Speakers will be Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie and Faye Harrison. ♦︎♦︎♦︎

April 6-7 — Multiple Venues

The 2017 Boundaries of Literature Symposium will include a free lecture on “Expertise and the Everyday: The humanities and ordinary life” and a graduate student seminar, “Who Knows Who Knows? Zadie Smith’s ‘The Embassy of Cambodia’ and Wiki Truth.” ♦︎♦︎

April 6-10 – Kenan Theatre

The Kenan Theatre Company concludes its season with Orange Light, a documentary theatre piece by Howard Craft that follows the tragic Hamlet, NC chicken plant fire. ♦︎♦︎♦︎♦︎♦︎♦︎

April 6 – 6:00 p.m. – Greenlaw Hall

Author Lara Naughton will visit campus for a reading and book signing. She will also give a workshop in Hyde Hall on April 7. ♦︎

April 6 – 7:30 p.m. – Person Recital Hall

The Composition Studio, taught by music professor Allen Anderson, will present new music. ♦︎

April 7-9 – UNC-Chapel Hill

The Parr Center for Ethics hosts the fifth annual National High School Ethics Bowl. ♦︎

April 7 — All Day — UNC campus

Arts Everywhere will launch UNC’s first annual campus-wide arts celebration with various events and activities including pop-up performances, exhibits, hands-on activities, installations, and behind-the-scenes tours of campus art spaces. ♦︎♦︎♦︎

April 7 — 3:00 p.m. — Begins at UNC’s Visitor’s Center

A distinctive walking tour on the African-American history of the University, with emphasis on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. ♦︎♦︎♦︎

April 7 – 3:00 p.m. – Caldwell Hall

The philosophy department’s inaugural 2017 Balter Distinguished Lecture will welcome Nina Emery to present a paper as part of their annual Speaker Series. ♦︎

April 7 — 4:00 p.m. — FedEx Global Education Center

Join the LGBTQ Representation and Rights Initiative’s discussion on “Being Out in North Carolina,” a conversation with current and former out NC LGBTQ Elected Officials. ♦︎♦︎

April 7 – 8:00 p.m. — Hill Hall

UNC Opera will perform Henry Purcell’s Dido and Aeneas with UNC Baroque Ensemble. ♦︎

April 8 — 10:15 a.m. — North Carolina Museum of Art

This seminar will provide historical and cultural context for North Carolina Museum of Arts’ exhibition, “Ansel Adams: Masterworks,” which features The Museum Set, a collection of photographs spanning five decades and chosen by Adams himself as the best work of his career. ♦︎♦︎

April 9 – 1:30 p.m. – Person Recital Hall

Join Robert Anderson’s bass studio for a fun afternoon filled with bass music. ♦︎

April 9 – 3:00 p.m. — Hill Hall

UNC Opera will perform Henry Purcell’s Dido and Aeneas with UNC Baroque Ensemble. ♦︎

April 9 – 7:30 p.m. – Hill Hall

Brent Wissick, Clara Yang, Donald Oehler and Nicholas DiEugenio will play Romantic Quintets of Brahms and Schumann as part of the Moeser Series. ♦︎

April 10-14 — Hanes Art Center

A one-week exhibit of Emily J. Smith’s thesis, “Succumb.” ♦︎

April 11 — 5:30 p.m. — Sonja Haynes Stone Center

Mary Beth Maxwell and Dorian T. Warren will discuss ‘Social and Economic Inequality in America’ as part of the department of public policy’s Carolina Forum. ♦︎

April 11 — 7:00 p.m. — FedEx Global Education Center

Padraic Kenney will discuss Poland and democracy as part of the Center for Slavic, Eurasian and East European Studies’ Endowed Lecture. ♦︎♦︎

April 12 – 4:30 p.m. – Flyleaf Books

The Program in the Humanities hosts a Humanities in Action event to discuss how Latino immigration transformed the rural South. ♦︎♦︎

April 12 – 5:00 p.m. – Wilson Library

Captain Michael John, U.S. Navy (ret.) will deliver the 2017 Coates Lecture. His talk, “A Carolina Narrative of Service to Nation: Yesterday and Today” celebrates the Wilson Special Collections Library exhibition Doing Our Bit: UNC and the Great War♦︎

April 12 — 7:30 p.m. — Memorial Hall

Sanam Marvi, Pakistan’s next inspiring diviner of South Asia’s humanist, folk and Sufi texts, performs as part of the Sacred/Secular: A Sufi Journey series. ♦︎♦︎♦︎♦︎

April 13 – 5:30 p.m. – Love House & Hutchins Forum

River Kings 2.0, with Alfred Banks and Marco Pavé, perform at the Center for the Study of the American South’s Music on the Porch Series. ♦︎♦︎

April 13 — 6:00 p.m. — Hanes Art Center

Zara Anishanslin will discuss “Portrait of a Woman in Silk: Hidden Histories of the British Atlantic World” as part of the art history colloquium. ♦︎

April 13 – 7:30 p.m. – Kenan Music Building

UNC Percussion Ensemble, directed by Juan Alamo, will perform its spring concert alongside guest artist Nathan Daughtrey, marimba. ♦︎

April 14 – 7:00 p.m. – Chapel Hill Public Library

Future Imperfect: What Science Fiction Film Tells Us About Now is a special lecture series at Chapel Hill Public Library held in partnership with the UNC Program in the Humanities as part of the NC Science Festival. Each event will have a talk punctuated with clips from Sci-Fi cinema. ♦︎

April 17 – 7:00 p.m. – Person Recital Hall

Mark Sparks, principal flute with the St. Louis Symphony, will give a masterclass and recital. ♦︎

April 17 – 7:00 p.m. – William and Ida Friday Center

Lewis Gordon will discuss “On the Study of Jews of Color,” and will conclude with reflections on why it is important to recognize and celebrate the tapestry of Jewish diversity. ♦︎♦︎

April 17-21 – John and June Allcott Library 

A one-week exhibit of Luke Firle’s sculptures, titled “It’s Gonna Be Something.”

April 18 – 7:30 p.m. – Hill Hall

Uzbek pianist Behzod Abduraimov’s electric performances have established him as a forerunner in the new generation of classical instrumentalists. ♦︎

April 18 – 3:30 p.m. – Dey Hall

Tiffany Stern discusses “Signing Plays and Playing Songs – Ballads and Plays in the Time of Shakespeare.” ♦︎♦︎

April 19 – 3:30 p.m. – Greenlaw Hall

Tiffany Stern leads a seminar, “Dumb Shows and the Invention of Stage Directions.” ♦︎♦︎

April 19 – 6:00 p.m. – Back Bar, Top of the Hill

Frederico Castelloes will discuss what happened in Brazil after the Olympics for Humanities Happy Hour. ♦︎

April 20-22 — TBD

The Center for Slavic, Eurasian and East European Studies hosts the 17th annual Czech Studies Workshop. ♦︎♦︎♦︎

April 20-23 – Swain Hall

The Four Underwear Models of the Apocalypse is a dance/theatre piece incorporating costumes, masks, and puppets depicting the end of the world in underpants. ♦︎

April 20 – 3:30 p.m. – Bull’s Head Bookshop

Paulette Ramsay will give a talk for the Stone Center’s Writer’s Discussion Series.

April 20 – 5:30 p.m. – Hamilton Hall

Miriam Cooke’s lecture, “Islamic State, Women and Violence,” will focus on media and artists’ representation of sexual violence in the 21st century Arab world. 

April 20 – 5:30 p.m. – Hanes Art Center

Join the Sloane Art Library and the Art and Museum Library and Information Student Society (AMLISS) for a Wikipedia edit-a-thon, focusing on art and feminism. ♦︎♦︎♦︎♦︎

April 20 — 7:00 p.m. — Dey Hall

The Center for Slavic, Eurasian and East European Studies presents Zamatovi Teroristi (Velvet Terrorists) as part of its Central Europe Film Series. ♦︎♦︎

April 20 – 7:30 p.m. – Memorial Hall

UNC hosts the signature concert of The Defiant Requiem Foundation, Defiant Requiem: Verdi at Terezín. 

April 21-22 — FedEx Global Education Center

The First Annual Maynard Adams Symposium on the Humanities focuses on the power of anger and resentment in our private lives and public conflicts. ♦

April 21 – 12:20 p.m. – Peabody Hall

Jenny Tone-Pah-Hote discusses “Kiowa Painters: Innovation in Art and Dance, 1928-1940” as part of the Art History Colloquium. 

April 21 — 2:00 p.m. — Wilson Library

“What is Digital Humanities?” is a workshop to discuss the topic and launch The Bibliography, Filmography, and Webography on Gender, War and the Western World since 1600. ♦︎♦︎♦︎

April 21 — 3:00 p.m. — Begins at UNC Visitor’s Center

Using traditional storytelling, the Native Narrative campus tour will give participants an accurate and complete story of the American Indian presence on Carolina’s campus. ♦︎♦︎♦︎

April 21 — 3:30 p.m. — Dey Hall

Petr Roubal will examine the deep and often troubling change of Central European cities after the fall of state socialism by using Prague as its case. ♦︎♦︎

April 21 – 4:15 p.m. – Person Recital Hall

William Cheng will give a lecture titled “The Prince and the Pauper: The Purpose of Sounding Great” as a part of the Carolina Symposia in Music and Culture series. 

April 21 — 5:30 p.m. — FedEx Global Education Center

Martha Nussbaum will give the keynote lecture as part of the Maynard Adams Symposium.

April 21 – 7:00 p.m. – Chapel Hill Public Library

Future Imperfect: What Science Fiction Film Tells Us About Now is a special lecture series at Chapel Hill Public Library held in partnership with the UNC Program in the Humanities as part of the NC Science Festival. Each event will have a talk punctuated with clips from Sci-Fi cinema. 

April 21 – 8:00 p.m. – Hill Hall

The Carolina Bluegrass Band, directed by Russell Johnson, performs. 

April 28 – 3:00 p.m. – Hanes Art Center 

The UNC art department celebrates the achievements of their students at the Spring 2017 Art Department Honors Symposium.

April 22 – 8:00 p.m. – Hill Hall

Come out for Charanga Carolina’s spring concert, directed by David Garcia. 

April 23 – 2:00 p.m. – Person Recital Hall

The UNC Guitar Ensemble, directed by Billy Stewart, performs. 

April 23 – 3:00 p.m. – Meymandi Hall, Raleigh

UNC Wind Ensemble joins the Triangle Wind Ensemble for Tradewinds: A Collaborative Concert, both conducted by Evan Feldman. 

April 23 – 7:00 p.m. – Hill Hall

The University Band, directed by Jeff Fuchs, performs. 

April 24 — May 14 — Hanes Art Center

“Site  Unseen” is a exhibition featuring works by UNC art department seniors. 

April 24 — 10 a.m. — Polk Place, UNC campus

A studio art majors seminar hosts a public postcard event to members of the North Carolina General Assembly. 

April 24 – 6:00 p.m. – FedEx Global Education Center

The What Diversity Sounds Like organization hosts a discussion, “Don’t End a Sentence With a Preposition: Where Do Such Rules Come From?” ♦︎♦︎♦︎

April 25 – 7:30 p.m. – Memorial Hall

Evan Feldman and Arris Golden conduct the UNC Wind Ensemble and UNC Symphony Band. 

April 26-30 — Kenan Theatre

PlayMakers presents a PRC2 show, Mr. Joy. A Harlem community takes stock when a Chinese immigrant’s shoe repair shop curiously doesn’t open one morning. An array of customers including indomitable 11-year-old Clarissa and “gangsta granny” Bessie come to realize what the shop owner has meant to their lives. 

April 26 — 7:30 p.m. — Person Recital Hall

The University Chamber Players perform. 

April 27 – 6:30 p.m. – FedEx Global Education Center

The Center for Slavic, Eurasian and East European Studies hosts Susan Rupp to discuss “Boldness of Spirit, Submission to Necessity: Russian State and Society during the First Cholera Pandemic, 1829-1832.” ♦︎♦︎

April 28 – 4:00 p.m. – Hill Hall

The UNC Jazz Combos will perform in a concert along with Alexis Cole, vocalist. This is part of the Fred and Gail Fearing Jazz for a Friday Afternoon series. 

April 28 – 8:00 p.m. — Person Recital Hall

UNC Baroque Ensemble and Consort of Viols, directed by Brent Wissick. 

April 29 – 9:00 a.m. – FedEx Global Education Center

Russia: Then & Now – A Dialogue Seminar will discuss the legacies of the Russian Revolution, within and outside of Russia, then and now. ♦︎♦︎

April 29 – 4:00 p.m. – Hill Hall

Vocalist Alexis Cole will give a jazz masterclass. 

April 29 – 8:00 p.m. – Hill Hall

The UNC Jazz Band closes out the 2016-17 concert season alongside Alexis Cole, vocalist. 

May

May 1-15 — Alumni Building

“Keep Out of Reach of Children” is an exhibition on the effects of inequality on the lives of children. ♦︎♦︎♦︎♦︎

May 5-6 – 8:00 p.m. – Swain Hall, Studio 6

The Process Series presents Leaving Eden by Mike Wiley, an original drama with regional music exploring the stories of people currently living in North Carolina Mill towns that boomed in the 20th century and closed down at the start of the 21st. 

May 6 — 9:15 a.m. — TBD

This year’s annual Uhlman Seminar will focus on Jewish culture as revealed through entertainment: music, film, folklore, humor, and the storytelling components present in all of these arts. 

May 17 — 6:00 p.m. — Top of the Hill

Michael Newton will discuss Scottish culture and heritage in North Carolina for Humanities Happy Hour.